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Publication type:Child protection
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Publication  —  Child protection  — 

Protecting children is one of the most important tasks the police undertake. Only the police can investigate suspected crimes, arrest perpetrators and monitor sex offenders. Police officers have the power to take a child who is in danger into a place of safety, or to seek an order to restrict an offender’s contact with children. The police service also has a significant role working with other agencies to ensure the child’s protection and well-being, longer term.

Publication  —  Child protection, Joint inspection, Mental health  — 

This report draws together findings from six joint targeted area inspections, focusing on the multi-agency response to children’s mental ill health. The findings in this report considers how local partnerships and services were responding to children and their families when children were living with mental ill health.

Publication  —  Child protection, Joint inspection  — 

Summary Between 2 and 6 December 2019, Care Inspectorate Wales (CIW), HMICFRS, Healthcare Inspectorate Wales, HMI Probation and Estyn carried out a joint inspection of the multiagency response to abuse and neglect in Newport. This inspection included an evaluation of how local services responded to child exploitation. This was the pilot inspection for Joint inspection

Publication  —  Child protection  — 

The assessment criteria set out the indicators of what HMICFRS would expect a good police force to be doing at each stage of the child’s journey, from first contact to ending involvement with the police service. These indicators are also broken down into examples of what the indicators might look like in practice.

Publication  —  Child protection  — 

National Child Protection Inspection Programme – Child protection inspection methodology

Publication  —  Child protection  — 

This document sets out the way in which HMICFRS proposes to conduct post-inspection follow-up activity of forces already inspected under the single-agency national child protection inspection across England and Wales.

Publication  —  Child protection  — 

Protecting children is one of the most important tasks the police undertake. Only the police can investigate suspected crimes, arrest perpetrators and monitor sex offenders. Police officers have the power to take a child who is in danger into a place of safety, or to seek an order to restrict an offender’s contact with children. The police service also has a significant role working with other agencies to ensure the child’s protection and well-being, longer term.

Publication  —  Child protection  — 

Protecting children is one of the most important tasks the police undertake. Only the police can investigate suspected crimes, arrest perpetrators and monitor sex offenders. Police officers have the power to take a child who is in danger into a place of safety, or to seek an order to restrict an offender’s contact with children. The police service also has a significant role working with other agencies to ensure the child’s protection and well-being, longer term.

Publication  —  Child protection, Joint inspection  — 

Between 24 February and 28 February 2020, Ofsted, the Care Quality Commission, HMICFRS and HMI Probation carried out a joint inspection of the multi-agency response to ‘front door’ services, evaluating all forms of abuse, neglect and exploitation, as well as an evaluation of the responses to children’s mental health in East Sussex.

Publication  —  Child protection  — 

Protecting children is one of the most important tasks the police undertake. Only the police can investigate suspected crimes, arrest perpetrators and monitor sex offenders. Police officers have the power to take a child who is in danger into a place of safety, or to seek an order to restrict an offender’s contact with children. The police service also has a significant role working with other agencies to ensure the child’s protection and well-being, longer term.