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https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmicfrs/recommendation/gloucestershire/8786/

Cause of concern

It is a cause of concern to HMIC that Gloucestershire Constabulary does not have essential processes in place to help it understand the threat from serious and organised crime, or to provide an effective multi-agency response to this type of offending. This is a particular concern as many of the shortcomings were set out in detail in HMIC’s 2015 effectiveness inspection, yet little has been done to address them.

Recommendation

The force should immediately take steps to:

• implement a structured process for assessing serious and organised crime threats, including so-called newer threats such as organised child sexual exploitation and modern slavery; • produce a serious and organised crime local profile in conjunction with partner organisations to enhance its understanding of the threat posed by serious and organised crime; • engage routinely with partner agencies at a senior level to enhance intelligence sharing and promote an effective, multi-agency response to serious and organised crime; • enhance its ability to gather and use intelligence from a range of sources to develop its understanding of serious and organised crime; • complete an action plan that sets out the steps it will take to maximise the use of regional organised crime unit capabilities, minimise duplication at force level, and ensure that the use of shared ROCU resources is prioritised effectively between forces in the south west region; and • enhance its approach to the 'lifetime management' of organised criminals, to minimise the risk they pose to local communities. This approach should include routine consideration of preventative orders, the enforcement powers of other organisations and other tools to deter organised criminals from continuing to offend.

[on]2nd March 2017 [status]awaiting-review[/status][/on][on]6th April 2018 [status]being-progressed[/status][/on][on]6th April 2018 [comment]

This was assessed as part of the 2017 effectiveness inspection, considerable progress had been made to address the causes for concern raised in the 2016 effectiveness inspection. The force has made improvements to the way it responds to serious and organised crime since the last HMICFRS inspection in 2016. It has an improved understanding of organised crime threats and this is starting to have a positive effect on its ability to disrupt organised criminals. It is also good at identifying those who may be vulnerable to being drawn into serious organised crime or gang activity.

The constabulary has implemented a structured process for assessing serious and organised crime threats, including newer threats such as organised child sexual exploitation and modern slavery, The force now uses structured methods to assess threats and prioritise resources and activity, including the use of MoRiLE processes . additionally, the first iteration of a pan-Gloucestershire serious and organised crime local profile has been completed with partner organisations to enhance its understanding of the threat posed by serious and organised crime; It engage routinely with partner agencies at a senior level to enhance intelligence sharing and promote an effective, multi-agency response to serious and organised crime and it has enhanced its ability to gather and use intelligence from a range of sources to develop its understanding of serious and organised crime.

The constabulary still needs to progress how it will maximise the use of regional organised crime unit capabilities, minimise duplication at force level, and ensure that the use of shared ROCU resources is prioritised effectively between forces in the south west region. The following AFI was included in the 2017 effectiveness report. 'The force should ensure that it makes maximum use of regional organised crime unit capabilities, and minimises their duplication at force level'.

[/comment][/on][on]26th April 2018 [comment]

As of Tuesday 3 April 2018, a new capability known as Regional Organised Crime Threat Assessment (ROCTA) will commence in the South West, which will provide a consistent and enhanced approach to the identification and assessment of threats from Organised Crime. This improved understanding will in turn support tasking processes at a force, regional and national level to ensure resources are focused on disrupting the highest threats to our communities. ROCTA will also assess our collective response to Serious and Organised Crime to better understand the disruptive impact and identify and share best practice across policing and wider law enforcement. Although led by the South West Regional Organised Crime Unit (SW ROCU), ROCTA is a partnership comprising of staff within the ROCU and staff working locally in Forces, who will together deliver this new capability.

As of 3 April new processes will commence for identification, assessment and creation of Organised Crime Groups (OCGs) and from the week beginning 9 April, OCG data will be accessible via the Police National Database (PND).

In addition, new processes for the assessment of Priority Individuals and Vulnerabilities will begin, which will widen our understanding and therefore response to threats.

Priority Individuals are those persons committing serious and organised crime on a sustained basis but are not part of a recognised Organised Crime Group.

Vulnerabilities are threats which do not manifest as a group or individual (for example vulnerability of drones at prisons, borders vulnerable to clandestine entry or bitcoin ATMs vulnerable to money laundering).

In Gloucestershire work has already commenced and initial consultation has taken place between SOC and the Neighbourhood Policing teams as currently most NP Inspectors are the local responsible officers for OCGs. Continued work will be carried out in the coming weeks. It is anticipated that there will be a period of time for this process to mature and fully embed across the Region.

[/comment][/on][on]3rd May 2018 [status]complete[/status][/on]