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Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service

Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire & rescue service covering the county of Merseyside in north-west England. The service is made up of five area commands: Liverpool, Wirral, Sefton, Knowsley, and St Helens.

The service provides a wide range of emergency response and prevention services. It has 26 stations and a marine rescue unit which protects and responds to the 1.4 million residents of Merseyside. Its purpose is to make Merseyside a safer, stronger and healthier community. The service’s home fire safety check programme is at the heart of its prevention strategy. It has fitted over 1 million free smoke detectors, giving bespoke fire safety advice and directing at-risk members of the community to partner service providers.

Connect with Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service

HMICFRS region and HMI

  • Her Majesty’s Inspector of Fire & Rescue Services (HMI): Phil Gormley is HMI for Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service
  • HMICFRS region: The service is in HMICFRS’ Northern fire region

Contact Phil Gormley

HMICFRS’ role in inspecting this service

For over 160 years, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary has independently assessed and reported on the efficiency and effectiveness of police forces and policing, in the public interest.

In summer 2017, HMIC (now HMICFRS) took on inspections of England’s fire & rescue services, assessing and reporting on their efficiency, effectiveness and leadership.

Key facts

Service Area

250 square miles

Population

1.42m people 2% local 5 yr change

Workforce

92% wholetime 8% on-call
0.71 per 1000 population local 1 national level
18% local 5 yr change 17% national 5 yr change

Assets

23 stations 59 appliances

Incidents

5.2 fire incidents per 1000 population local 3.0 national
2.3 non-fire incidents per 1000 population local 3.1 national
3.8 false alarms per 1000 population local 4.1 national

Cost

£25,750 local per 1000 population per year £22,380 national per 1000 population per year

Fire & Rescue Chief

Phil Garrigan