Skip to content

Nottinghamshire 2017

Read more about Nottinghamshire 2017

This is HMICFRS’ fourth PEEL (police effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy) assessment of Nottinghamshire Police. PEEL is designed to give the public information about how their local police force is performing in several important areas, in a way that is comparable both across England and Wales, and year on year. The assessment is updated throughout the year with our inspection findings and reports.

The extent to which the force is effective at keeping people safe and reducing crime is not yet graded.

The extent to which the force is efficient at keeping people safe and reducing crime requires improvement.

The extent to which the force is legitimate at keeping people safe and reducing crime is not yet graded.

The efficiency inspection findings are published below.

Zoë Billingham, Her Majesty’s Inspector of Constabulary

Contact Zoë Billingham

HMI's observations

My overall assessment of Nottinghamshire’s performance will be published in spring 2018, following the publication of the legitimacy and effectiveness inspections in December 2017 and March 2018, respectively.

Effectiveness

How effective is the force at keeping people safe and reducing crime?

To be graded
View the five questions for effectiveness

Efficiency

How efficient is the force at keeping people safe and reducing crime?

Last updated 09/11/2017
Requires improvement

Nottinghamshire Police is judged to require improvement in the efficiency with which it keeps people safe and reduces crime. Our overall judgment this year is the same as last year. The force is judged to be good for its understanding of demand; it is assessed to require improvement for its use of resources to manage demand; and its planning for future demand is judged to require improvement.

Nottinghamshire Police’s understanding of the demand for its services is improving. The force’s good understanding of current demand is based mostly on analysis of police data and could be broadened by regular analysis of data from other organisations. It is developing its understanding of those crimes which are less likely to be reported. The force only partially understands the factors that can affect demand and is developing an approach to assessing external factors that are likely to affect future demand, such as technological, economic and social changes. It could improve how it manages, prioritises and filters demand. Sometimes it may be inadvertently suppressing demand and there are times when demand exceeds available resources, placing pressure on frontline officers.

The force has improved its understanding of the skills and capabilities of its workforce. It does not yet have a good understanding of the skills and capabilities of its leaders, but has well-developed plans to achieve this. Until it completes its leadership skills audit and subsequent skills needs analysis, it cannot tailor its development opportunities effectively and it would benefit from a formal talent management programme. Leaders continue to seek out new ideas, approaches and working practices. The force encourages its workforce to make suggestions and put forward ideas, and leaders listen to them.

The force would benefit from a wider programme to identify and analyse trends to understand future demand and improve its ability to plan. It does not always identify benefits achieved through change programmes or eliminate inefficiency effectively. However, it plans to conduct annual departmental assessments using priority-based budgeting which will help identify inefficiency. The force works well with others to manage local demand for its services and continues to consider other options for collaboration that will reduce costs and increase resilience and capacity.

Nottinghamshire Police has made good progress in improving the quality and robustness of its financial planning and management. The force is investing to increase its capacity and capability, and has good ICT infrastructure and estates projects. Although its current limited funds in reserve could restrict its ability to invest, the force has committed to making additional one-off savings to replenish these reserves and provide greater financial resilience for the future.

View the three questions for efficiency

Legitimacy

How legitimate is the force at keeping people safe and reducing crime?

To be graded
View the three questions for legitimacy

Other inspections

How well has the force performed in our other inspections?

In addition to the three core PEEL pillars, HMICFRS carries out inspections of a wide range of policing activity throughout the year. Some of these are conducted alongside the PEEL inspections (for instance, our 2016 leadership assessment); others are joint inspections.

Findings from these inspections are published separately to the main PEEL reports, but are taken into account when producing the rounded assessment of each force's performance.

Key facts

Force Area

834 square miles

Population

1.12m people 7% local 10 yr change

Workforce

73% frontline 78% national level
3.3 per 1000 population 3.6 national level
15% change in local workforce since 2010 15% national change since 2010

Victim-based crimes

0.06 per person 0.06 national level
Local 5 year trend (no change) National 5 year trend (no change)

Cost

48p per person per day local 55p per person per day national

Points of context provided by the force

  • The force covers the county of Nottinghamshire; an area of 834 square miles. It has 1,893 police officers,  1,244 staff including PCSOs, and around 250 special constables and 50 police cadets
  • Around 1.1 million people mainly live in the urban centres which include the city of Nottingham, as well as the towns of Mansfield, Worksop and Newark-on-Trent.

Police and crime plan priorities

Paddy Tipping, the Commissioner for Nottinghamshire, continues to prioritise his seven strategic themes:

  • Protect, support and respond to victims, witnesses and vulnerable people.
  • Improve the efficiency, accessibility and effectiveness of the criminal justice process.
  • Focus on priority crime types and those local areas that are most affected by crime and anti-social behaviour.
Read More
  • Reduce the impact of drugs and alcohol on levels of crime and anti-social behaviour.
  • Reduce the threat from organised crime.
  • Prevention, early intervention and reduction in reoffending.
  • Spending public money wisely.

In 2017-18, and beyond, managing resources to current and new demands with limited funding will be a major cross-cutting activity.

Incidents which carry higher threat, risk or harm will always be prioritised but where demand outstrips resources, new ways of working will be inevitable.

The PCC is keen to maintain Neighbourhood Police Teams, to provide better services for victims and protect them from cyber-crime, especially young people.

Finally, terrorism continues to be a major threat.