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Leicestershire 2017

Read more about Leicestershire 2017

This is HMICFRS’ fourth PEEL (police effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy) assessment of Leicestershire Police. PEEL is designed to give the public information about how their local police force is performing in several important areas, in a way that is comparable both across England and Wales, and year on year. The assessment is updated throughout the year with our inspection findings and reports.

The extent to which the force is effective at keeping people safe and reducing crime is not yet graded.

The extent to which the force is efficient at keeping people safe and reducing crime requires improvement.

The extent to which the force is legitimate at keeping people safe and reducing crime is not yet graded.

The efficiency inspection findings are published below.

Zoë Billingham, Her Majesty’s Inspector of Constabulary

Contact Zoë Billingham

HMI's observations

My overall assessment of Leicestershire’s performance will be published in spring 2018, following the publication of the legitimacy and effectiveness inspections in December 2017 and March 2018, respectively.

Effectiveness

How effective is the force at keeping people safe and reducing crime?

To be graded
View the five questions for effectiveness

Efficiency

How efficient is the force at keeping people safe and reducing crime?

Last updated 09/11/2017
Requires improvement

Leicestershire Police is judged to require improvement in the efficiency with which it keeps people safe and reduces crime. This overall judgment is not consistent with last year when we judged the force as good for efficiency overall. The force’s understanding of demand is judged to require improvement; it is judged to require improvement for its use of resources to manage demand; and its planning for future demand is judged to require improvement.

Leicestershire Police has recognised that its organisational structure is causing some inefficiencies. The force is addressing this through an extensive change programme that will see a reorganisation of its workforce and considerable changes in how incidents and investigations are managed. The way that the force currently prioritises and manages calls for service from the public creates delays in dealing with non-emergency incidents; it is taking steps to address this. The force is improving how it manages hidden demand and its workforce is becoming more aware of crimes such as human trafficking and so-called honour-based violence.

While the force has a sound understanding of the operational skills of its officers and staff, its understanding of the broader skills, experience and leadership capabilities of its workforce could be improved. The force should consider how it can further encourage talented people within its workforce; there is no formal development scheme and there is an inconsistent approach in how officers and staff identified as having high potential are developed. Encouragingly, the force seeks external applicants during promotion processes for police officers.

The force works in close collaboration with neighbouring police forces, achieving economies of scale for a broad range of specialist policing functions. It undertakes effective joint work with other local agencies, like local councils and other emergency services, but the benefits of some of these collaborations could be more fully assessed and then replicated more widely throughout the force.

It is investing in new technology, such as mobile devices for all frontline officers and staff, a new digital telephony system and better facilities to receive online contact from the public. These initiatives will help to improve the efficiency of the workforce. The force is also exploring how technology might improve the exchange of information between partner agencies to help predict future demand.

The force’s finances are stable and it has consistently met savings targets. However, it is entering a difficult period in which the workforce will be restructured so that the force can meet an increasing workload despite gaps in future budgets. The force will need to plan carefully to achieve a sustainable financial position, while meeting that increased demand.

View the three questions for efficiency

Legitimacy

How legitimate is the force at keeping people safe and reducing crime?

To be graded
View the three questions for legitimacy

Other inspections

How well has the force performed in our other inspections?

In addition to the three core PEEL pillars, HMICFRS carries out inspections of a wide range of policing activity throughout the year. Some of these are conducted alongside the PEEL inspections (for instance, our 2016 leadership assessment); others are joint inspections.

Findings from these inspections are published separately to the main PEEL reports, but are taken into account when producing the rounded assessment of each force's performance.

Key facts

Force Area

980 square miles

Population

1.04m people 10% local 10 yr change

Workforce

76% frontline 78% national level
3.3 per 1000 population 3.6 national level
10% change in local workforce since 2010 15% national change since 2010

Victim-based crimes

0.05 per person 0.06 national level
Local 5 year trend National 5 year trend (no change)

Cost

46p per person per day local 55p per person per day national

Points of context provided by the force

  • The growing population is becoming more diverse. Safeguarding those who are most vulnerable is a high priority.
  • The force’s modernisation programme has diversified its workforce and introduced mobile technology to ensure a frontline presence in its communities.

Police and crime plan priorities

The underlying theme of Lord Willy Bach’s first Police and Crime Plan, which sets the priorities for policing in Leicestershire, is preventative work to tackle criminality.

This approach is directly aimed at increasing community safety and so reduce the growing demand upon police resources.

The Plan is built around five core themes – Viable Partnerships, Visible Policing, Victim Services, Vulnerability Protection and Value for Money.

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Despite harsh funding cuts over recent years the budget provides investment for additional police officers to enhance visibility; will fund a revitalised approach to supporting victims of crime and antisocial behaviour; reinforces the Commissioner’s commitment to protect vulnerable members of society; and places increased emphasis on building strong relationships with strategic partners, crucial to delivering these objectives.

The aim is to secure a quality policing service that meets the needs of those who live, work or visit in the area.