Crime data integrity programme - judgment criteria

The process for determining overall graded judgments for the crime data integrity (CDI) programme consists of three stages, and is set out below.

Elements of the inspection

Each inspection consists of an assessment of the extent to which the force:

  • records all reported:
    • crime
    • violent crime
    • sexual offences
    • rapes;
  • correctly uses classification N100 in regards to reports of rape;
  • records crimes received into its safeguarding/vulnerable people unit;
  • identifies and records crime regarding modern slavery;
  • correctly cancels recorded reports of:
    • rape
    • other sexual offences
    • violent crime
    • robbery;
  • obtains the information necessary for it to understand and apply an equality test to its crime-recording decisions;
  • has implemented the recommendations made in our 2014 CDI inspection;
  • places the victim at the centre of crime-recording decisions; and
  • has implemented the national action plan for CDI.

Stage 1

Through HMIC’s audit of reports of crime and through the fieldwork stage of each force inspection, HMIC will rate each of the above elements as either outstanding, good, requires improvement or inadequate.

Please note: these initial judgments are for internal grading purposes, they will not be published in each force report.

Detailed criteria by question

The detailed judgment criteria provides further explanation of how our initial judgments are made for each of the elements. These criteria reflect the general principle from the Home Office Counting Rules that “victims are believed and benefit from statutory entitlements under the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime“.

Stage 2

Determining the overall graded judgment

To determine the graded judgments for each of the individual elements, the CDI programme will use HMIC’s standard grading criteria as summarised in the table below.

Graded judgment Cause of concern
with recommendation
Area for improvement
No recommendation
Outstanding no no
Good no may be present
Requires improvement may be present must be present
Inadequate must be present may be present

Greater weighting will be given to the recording rates of the following three crime types:

  • violence
  • sexual offences
  • rape.

These were the areas of greatest concern identified in our 2014 report.

Therefore, to come to an overall graded judgment we will place greatest emphasis on these three elements in deciding the overall graded judgment.

This approach is set out in the table below.

Stage 1 assessment of violent crime,
sexual offences or rape
Overall graded judgment
If the recording accuracy of 2 or more of the above elements are inadequate The overall judgment must be inadequate.
If the recording accuracy of only 1 of the above elements is inadequate The overall judgment must not exceed requires improvement. The judgment may be inadequate when all elements of the inspection are taken into account.
If the recording accuracy of 2 or more of the above elements are requires improvement The overall judgment must not exceed requires improvement.The judgment may be inadequate when all elements of the inspection are taken into account.
If the recording accuracy of only 1 of the above elements is requires improvement The overall judgment must not exceed good. The judgment may be requires improvement or inadequate when all elements of the inspection are taken into account.
In all other cases It is possible for the overall judgment to be outstanding. However, the judgment may be good or requires improvement when all elements of the inspection are taken into account.

Stage 3

To ensure consistency, a moderation process will be undertaken. As the CDI reports will be published in small batches this will involve moderation across those reports to be published, and consideration of the graded judgments already applied to previously published reports.